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The Fox's Den

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Posts tagged with "ericsson"

Mar 8

Ga(y)mer

*the video clicks on, showing a top down shot of a phone lying on a wooden table*

Hey guys, Seth here. I’m not really good with review videos like this, but I wanted to review this phone I bought a while ago, just cause I think it’s really cool.

*Seth picks up the phone in his paw*

The phone I bought is a Sony Ericsson Xperia Play.

*An annotation pops up, displaying a link to a page with specs*

This phone is seriously the best thing I’ve owned. Sure, it’s last years technology, but the Android operating system is so versatile, I’m sure even early phone models can run the apps this thing can, at least the apps use on it.

*he clicks on the screen, and unlocks it, swiping through a few homescreens running several widgets per screen*

Now, I LOVE widgets. I love being able to unlock my phone and quickly check something, like say, my Minecraft server-

*he swipes to a homescreen with a block at the top showing statistics*

You can see that there are two people on it now, and it’s daytime in-world. I can tap the number showing how many players there are and get details of any player that’s ever logged into it. I can send a console command here, and I can even tap the time and change it to night.

It’s quick, it’s smooth, and it runs great with games.

*he turns it to it’s side, and slides up the screen, revealing a very PSP-esque game pad*

I believe Sony did an excellent job designing the game pad. Firm directional pad, nice solid triangle, circle, square and cross buttons, even has start and select buttons, and L and R triggers on the back. But I REALLY love this pad right here.

*he points to an oval shaped area in the center of the pad*

This is a multi-touch pad that’s split into two virtual analog sticks. Newer gaming apps have been developed to use these as inputs, and older apps are updating to support them as well.

The OS seems pretty stock, you got your usual Android features. Live wallpapers, multiple homescreens and all that. But what I find really fascinating about the OS is this right here-

*he pops open his apps folder, and taps an icon opening up the video game “Crash Bandicoot”*

Now, you may be asking yourself, “Oh it comes with Crash on it, I could probably buy that in the Market,” but that’s where you’re wrong. THIS app is actually an emulator, running a ripped copy of the Crash game. Legal for Sony to do, they DO own the hardware and software to do this, but this is the ONLY game that it can run stock. There is a software package out there that lets you copy the Crash app to your computer, extract the emulator software, and inject your own ISOs back into a neat Android package, and install it on your phone. I run all my Playstation games this way, except for Final Fantasy VII because multi-disk support hasn’t been reverse engineered for it yet, though the emulator DOES support multi-disk games.

*he flips the phone over, showing the thickness of the phone*

I’ve actually had to buy a bigger battery for this phone because I’ve been playing more and more games on it. I play in my down time during class, like while waiting for other students to finish a paper, or in between classes. I play while riding in the car with others, while bored at home, and even in bed.

*he swipes through a few menus, and opens up a gaming app*

I have the “OnLive” app, which is a new generation “cloud based” computer gaming service. You buy the game from their store, their servers render out the video, and it streams to your phone like a video. It allows me to play computer quality games on my phone.

*he taps on an icon, and opens a video game*

Right now, I’m in the middle of a game of Amnesia: The Dark Descent. I have to say, this is the first time I’ve played this game, and I’m already scared shitless of losing lantern oil. It streams well over 3g, and amazingly over wifi. There’s no quality loss, and the textures are fantastic. You can even buy a home console for this service. It’s really tiny, and is basically just an ARM based computer running on low budget CPU that streams the video to your TV through a wired internet connection in a similar fashion like the app. But THAT’S for another review.

So anyway, I would REALLY recommend this phone to ANY gamer. With the combination of the built in gamepad, and a few emulators you can get for free, or low price, on the market, this thing is a gaming machine. They retail for about $350-400, but I bought mine, second hand, for $150. The guy I bought it from was really creepy, and the phones he sold were probably stolen, but it’s still a great deal for a phone that actually works.

So, that’s my review for this great phone!

*he opens a sketching app, and draws a big pink heart on the screen*

Thanks for watching guys~ <3

*click*

Seth's Blog This is Seth's blog. In it, you'll find the life of a crazy fox. Watch your step, though, some of the posts may require parental supervision. :3